Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Protein Cookies

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With the popularity of protein bars and the new protein “cookie” on the rise, I figured I’d try my hand at baking my own protein cookies.

These little cookies pack a powerful nutritional punch! One of the main ingredients, coconut flour, is gluten-free, and high in fiber and iron. I also included oats because they are also a great source of fiber and iron! Replace the eggs with your favorite egg-replacer and they can also be vegan. I added date paste to sweeten them without adding sugar. And of course, they wouldn’t be cookies without chocolate chips. Here I used Chatfield’s 70% cacao double dark semi-sweet chocolate chips (nut, dairy and soy free) because we can’t forget the important antioxidants and flavanols found in dark chocolate! Keep a cookie in your gym bag as a post-workout snack or  take a few along to share on your next hike.

Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Protein Cookies

Dry Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup coconut flour
  • 1 scoop Designer Whey Chocolate Protein Powder
  • 1/4 cup rolled oats*
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp iodized sea salt**
  • 1/4 cup PBFit peanut butter powder
  • 1/3 cup dark chocolate chips

Wet Ingredients

  • 6 pitted medjool dates, chopped roughly
  • 1 tsp warm water
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F
  2. Add dates and warm water to food processor and process until it becomes a paste
  3. Combine date paste, eggs, and vanilla in medium bowl and whisk until combined
  4. In a separate bowl, whisk all dry ingredients together except chocolate chips
  5. Add wet ingredients to dry and mix until a soft dough forms
  6. Fold in chocolate chips
  7. Roll dough into balls and press into a flat shape onto non-stick cookie sheet
  8. Bake for 9-11 minutes

Yield: 8 cookies

* use gluten-free oats if making gluten-free cookies. Oats are naturally gluten-free, however most are processed in facilities that process wheat products.

** make sure if you buy sea salt, to buy iodized se sea salt. Most sea salt in stores is not iodized. Iodine is an important nutrient found in regular table salt that you might be missing if you use strictly sea salt.

Nutrition Information

Note: You can double the recipe and make larger cookies at ~300 kcal, 10 g fiber, 8 g fat and 14 g of protein if you are looking for a “meal replacement” cookie

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